Monthly Archives: February 2012

How to Request and Get Advice on Jobs for Your Son or Daughter

You are here on this page because you want to know how you can request and get advice on your son or daughter future career. Here below I am listing some sample request letters:

1. Inquiring how to make a Daughter a School Teacher:

19 PLUME ROAD,

BALHAM, S.\V.12.

DEAR MRS. WHITE,

I have been giving a lot of thought lately to Dorothy’s future. She is now sixteen, and I feel it is time to make up our minds what she is to do to earn a living. She thinks she would like school-teaching, and it strikes me as a very good choice. As you know the profession so intimately, I thought perhaps you would tell me if it is one you would recommend for Dorothy, and what steps I ought to take to secure her training. I am afraid it is troubling you a great deal, but I know you are interested in Dorothy, so I hope you will forgive me.

Yours sincerely,

HERBERT JACKSON.

Reply:

84 TRANMERE AVENUE,

TOOTING, S.W.17.

DEAR MR. JACKSON,

I am delighted to be of any assistance to you in finding a suitable career for Dorothy, and I may say at once I think she has all the qualifications for a teacher. She is fond of children, bright, and strong, and will probably have no difficulty in passing her examinations. To any girl fitted for it, there is really no better profession. Among its advantages are good pay, good holidays, short hours, security of tenure, and pension, and, above all, it is womanly work. The training need not cost you a lot of money, as you can obtain grants and scholarships. The profession is, of course, more overcrowded than it used to be, and it is sometimes difficult to obtain a post for some months after the training is completed, but, when a post is obtained, a teacher does not easily become unemployed. A serious consideration is the ban recently placed upon married teachers by the London County Council and other bodies. Girls may well hesitate to spend five years in training for a profession which they are compelled to give up on marriage two or three years later.

As to the training, the first step is to decide whether Dorothy means to become a teacher in an Elementary or a Secondary school. As Dorothy has already matriculated, and has been educated at a Secondary school, she could qualify for work in a Secondary school, but that means four years at college, and then posts in Secondary schools are not easy to obtain.

The steps she would have to take are these:

As an Elementary School Teacher—Apply for a L.C.C. teaching scholarship, which would enable her to remain two years at school without fees, during which she could study for the Inter. Arts or Science exam. No teaching is done now before going to College. At ‘8 she will have to go to a Training College for two years, when she would work for the Board of Education Certificate, and, if she had passed the Inter, exam before entering, possibly a degree. A list of colleges, with fees, can be obtained from the Board of Education. Scholarships can usually be obtained from the L.C.C. to cover a large part of the fees.

As a Secondary School Teacher.—Dorothy would remain at school for two years and take either Inter. Arts or Science, but at iS she would have to go to college for four years. Three years are given to taking the final examination for a Science or Art degree, (usually an Honours degree), and the fourth year to obtaining the Teachers’ Diploma.

The salaries are now fixed by the Burnham scales, and vary according to districts. Elementary school teachers start at about £130 and rise to about £300 a year. Secondary school teachers get about a hundred a year more. Headmistresses, of course, get much bigger salaries.

Dorothy could become an Uncertificated Teacher or a teacher in a private school without much further education or training, but she certainly ought to get her certificate.

The best thing you can do is to see her Headmistress at once, and through her get in touch with the L.C.C. training department.

Yours faithfully,

MABEL WHITE.

2. Advising Sending a Son to Sea:

84 PALEY ROAD,

LIVERPOOL

DEAR MR. GILBERT,

If I were in your shoes, I should certainly have no hesitation in letting Jack have his wish and take up the sea as a career. Why not? He is a steady, robust lad, able to look after himself, and one who, I think you may be sure, will lead a roving life, whether you wish it or not.

As to how it can be done, there are two ways—apprentice him to one of the big shipping companies, who will require a premium, or let him go to a training ship. The White Star Line take apprentices and send them on four sailing voyages at a cost of about £200. Some of the smaller companies no doubt will take apprentices for much less, but the lad may have rather a rough time.

In your case I should send Jack to either the Conway training ship at Birkenhead, or the Worcester at Greenhithe. The first takes boys from 12 to 16, and the second boys from 11.5 to 15. The cost is about £… a year, and the course lasts for two years.

At 17, if he has been at sea four years, he can take the Second Mate’s certificate, at 19 the First Mate’s, and at 21 the Master’s. When he has had sufficient experience he should have no difficulty in getting a ship. The life, of course, is only suitable to certain lads, but I think Jack is one of them.

Yours ever,

SID BAILEY.

3. Applying for a Clerkship in a Bank for Daughter:

48 WHITING LANE,

CHISWICK W.4.

The Manager,

—————- Bank,

Chiswick.

DEAR MR. JENKINS,

Do you think you could help me in any way to get my daughter Elsie into your Bank? I know you employ a good many girls, and I am anxious to get her placed as soon as possible. She is i was educated at the High School for Girls, and obtained the General Schools Certificate. She also knows shorthand and typing. If you can help me in any way, or give me any advice as to placing Elsie, I shall be very grateful.

Yours faithfully,

M. S. TAYLOR.

Reply from Bank Manager:

—————- Bank,

Curswwx, W.

DEAR MR. TAYLOR,

I am afraid this is not a very propitious time for trying to get your daughter into the Bank. We already have a long waiting list, and the Banks generally are decreasing their number of women employees in favour of men. However, I will certainly send your application along to Headquarters with a strong recommendation. She is the right age and has the necessary qualifications. She should be able to type 50 words a minute and write shorthand at 120. She would have to pass a medical examination and our own Entrance examination, but, as she has already got the General Schools Certificate, she will not find that difficult. The salary commences at £65 a year and increases by £10 a year.

I think you would be wise to enter your daughter’s name for other Banks, if you can get introductions, and also for any of the large firms like Insurance companies, where the conditions of employment are very similar. Indeed many of the posts to be obtained in private business firms are much better paid than work in a Bank.

If your daughter has learned her shorthand and typing at one of the well-known commercial schools, as I presume she has, why not let them find her a post? If she can add fluent proficiency in a foreign language to her qualifications, say Spanish, she should, after a few years’ experience, be able to command a salary of three or four pounds a week. Banks are safe, and genteel, and usually comfort able, but private business gives many more opportunities.

Yours faithfully,

P. JENKINS.

4. Advising on a Boy becoming an Engineer

242 THORPE PARK,

HAMPSTEAD, N.W.3.

DEAR MR. WHITE,

Your question, “How can you make your son an engineer? “is so vague that it is very difficult to answer satisfactorily. The word “engineer” covers a wide range of workers. A lad can become an engineer by becoming an apprentice to an engineering firm, and can choose the particular branch he likes—electrical, motor, marine, &c. He will have to serve three or five years at a nominal wage, and then will become a fitter or mechanic, able to earn, when he can obtain work, wages from £3 to £6 a week, according to his work and experience. Mechanics who have been able to take up a special branch of delicate machinery, like printing machinery, for instance, often command high wages for their expert ability. Then there is promotion to foremen and work-managers at substantial salaries for the successful men, and also opportunities of going abroad.

Such engineers, of course, are workmen, and probably you want your son to take it up as a profession. If he has been to a secondary or public school, he should study at one of the engineering colleges attached to any of the Universities. In London he can make his choice from East London College, Engineering School.

Imperial College of Science and Technology.

Engineering Schools of University College,Gower St., W.C.

King’s College,Strand, W.C.

Faraday College,Southampton Row, W.C.

City and Guilds College, South Kensington.

He will also have to spend two years or more as an apprentice in engineering works, either before or after his college training—preferably before. He will then be qualified for all manner of good posts in engineering and contracting firms in all parts of the world, but he may not find it easy to obtain one without influence.

If you care to write me again a little more fully, perhaps I can give you rather more detailed information.

Yours sincerely,

ALEX. GIBSON.

5. Advising on Making a Daughter a Nurse

HOSPITAL.

DEAR MRS. ALLEN,

Whether it is wise for you to let your daughter train as a nurse depends on one thing mainly—if she is really attracted to the work for the work’s sake. If she isn’t  she certainly should not do it, for the work is hard and trying, and the monetary rewards are very inadequate. She would have to be physically very fit.

How she would have to start is as a probationer at a Hospital, and she should apply to the Secretary for particulars. She would have to be twenty-three to enter a General Hospital, and twenty a Children’s Hospital. She would be a probationer for three years and would have to do a lot of hard, manual work, as well as attend lectures and classes. She would get a nominal salary—not more than £25 a year, and all found.

After her training she would be able to take up private work, when her earnings would vary immensely, and might be £3 a week, or work in connection with a nursing institution, when she would earn less, or remain at a Hospital. Then she would earn about £so a year as a nurse, £100 if she became a Sister, and £200 or more if she became a Matron, with all found in each case.

Perhaps this letter sounds very discouraging, but if your daughter really wants to do the work it won’t deter her. I ought to add, perhaps, that the great majority of girls who do train as nurses—indeed, nearly all—love the work. If your daughter cares to come to see me, I will show her round the hospital and let her see what her life would be like if she were on the staff.

With kind regards,

Yours sincerely,

RUTH POWELL.

6. Advising on Making a Son a Journalist

84 TYRE LANE,

BRIXTON, S.W.2.

MY DEAR FELLOWES,

You ask me how you can set to work to make your son a journalist. At first I was going to send you my usual reply to this question—” Don’t I” But on second thoughts, as I reflected that you had probably given the matter full consideration, I decided to add a few particulars.

First, don’t think because a boy has an inclination and a certain facility for writing he is a born journalist. He probably isn’t  Many journalists don’t have to write at all—they record what other people say, or else correct and alter what other people have written. Those who do earn their living by writing are mostly not journalists, and as a rule don’t earn a living by writing at all— they’ve usually taken the precaution to find some other mode of livelihood, to which they add by writing.

However, possibly you know all this, and, if you’re still determined to launch your boy on the perilous paths, the only thing to do is to find some editor who will be willing to take him on as a junior. Sometimes a lad is articled to an editor for a term of years at a small salary (which, as a rule, you have to find first in the form of a premium), but this is by no means essential, if you can find an office that will take him without. The more important the paper the better of course, but you won’t find it easy without influence. I will keep my eye open for you, and let you know if I hear of an opening. There is no chance at all on the London dailies. Your only hope is the suburban or provincial weeklies, which would give a good training.

After about three years as a junior, or at the end of his apprenticeship, if he developed his shorthand to verbatim speed, he should be able to obtain a post as a reporter, with a salary ranging from £4 4s. in the provinces to £9 9s. in London—according to the standing of the paper; or as a sub-editor, with a salary ranging from £5 5s. to £15 15S. Later he may develop into a special correspondent, leader-writer, or editor, with a salary of anything between £250 and £5,000 a year.

The boy should, of course, have a good general education, good appearance, be alert and quick. A knowledge of foreign languages would be a great asset to him.

In conclusion, let me get back to the warning note— the work is hard, if interesting, the hours irregular, night work frequent, and, worst of all, there is never anything approaching security of tenure, while a journalist’s career is apt to end in middle life. After that he often becomes a “writer,” earning occasional guineas.

Yours sincerely,

MICHAEL WOODS.

7. Advising on Emigration

28 THE DELL,

HARROW.

DEAR MRS. JONES,

I am sorry you are feeling so worried about your boy and girl, and I shall be delighted if I can be of any assistance to you.

I am afraid emigration is not the panacea for all ills that some people think it. There is one class of workers who are always wanted—men for agricultural work and girls for domestic work. If your son and daughter were fitted and willing to do this class of work, all you need do is to apply to the Commissioners in London for Australia,Canada,South Africa, or New Zealand, and they would make the matter easy for you. The life would be hard, but as your son would have some capital he could look forward to running his own farmstead in due course— and to many men that is a great attraction. Your daughter would find domestic work quite different from what it is in England. It would be hard, but she would always be treated as one of the family, and she would almost certainly marry. Possibly, however, the life of a farmer’s wife doesn’t appeal to her.

There are other ways of emigrating. Tea-planting in Ceylon offers opportunities to young men who have been well-educated and have some capital. Rubber-planting in Malay, coffee-growing in Kenya, fruit-growing in the Transvaal all offer openings, but as a rule capital is required.

If you have, say, £5,000 which you could spare to establish a home in the colonies, you might for that be able to buy an estate, which your son and daughter could be trained to run.

If you are really thinking seriously of it, I should advise you to call at the London offices of the agents or commissioners for the various colonies. You can get the addresses from the Directory, and you may be sure of receiving courteous attention.

I think you will be wise to go thoroughly into the matter. Many people turn to emigration for no other reason than a mere sense of restlessness or vague discontent. With them it is anything for a change, although it is obvious that changes can be for the worse as well as for the better. On the other hand, people who might emigrate with advantage fail to do because of a conservative attachment to old ways and places and a nervous dislike of anything new. I think it is most probable that the colonies hold a much better future for your young people than the old country, and it is very wise and unselfish of you to be willing to make some sacrifice to give them the better opportunity.

Yours sincerely,

VICTOR NISBET.

Sample Letters to Principal from Parent for Terms, Admission and Teacher Request

1. To the Principal of a School, asking for Terms, &c

48 Towns ROAD,

EALING, W.5.

The Principal,

——— School.

DEAR MADAM,

I shall be very much obliged if you will send me a prospectus of your school, giving full particulars as to terms, &c. I have a daughter of twelve whom I wish to send to a boarding school in the autumn. She has so far been educated in the Ealing High School for Girls, and I think has made fair progress. I wish her to pay special attention to French, music, and dancing.

Will you please let me know if you will have a vacancy in the autumn and when I may come down to see the school? I shall also be obliged if you would give me the name and address of anyone whose children have been to the school and who would be willing to answer inquiries.

Yours faithfully,

LENORE ALLEN.

2. To Principal, acknowledging Reply

48 Towns ROAD,

EALING, W.5.

The Principal,

——— School.

DEAR MADAM,

I thank you for your letter of the 15th, with prospectus. It seems very satisfactory, and I have had a very complimentary letter from Mrs. Ainslie, but I should like to bring my daughter down to see you and the school before making up my mind. As you were kind enough to suggest any Friday, we will come down on Friday next by the 11.17 from Paddington.

Yours faithfully,

LENORE ALLEN.

3. To Principal, entering Daughter for School

48 Towns ROAD,

EALING, W.5.

The Principal,

——— School.

DEAR MADAM,

I have now decided to send Phyllis to you in the autunm. I return herewith the Entrance Form duly filled in, and a cheque for £5 to cover the entrance fee. I think, after my conversation with you, you quite under stand my wishes about her education, and I hope you will find her a good pupil. You will, no doubt, let me know later what her requirements will be, and when the autumn term begins.

We shall be abroad for the next three months, but any letters sent to the above address will be forwarded.

Yours faithfully,

LENORE ALLEN.

4. To Principal, respecting Pupil’s Complaint

48 TOWERS ROAD,

EALING, W.5.

DEAR Miss WESTON,

I have been rather disturbed by the letters I have received lately from Phyllis. She doesn’t seem happy. It is not that she makes any definite complaint, although she grumbles a little about the food not being to her liking, but she seems dispirited and to dislike the life in Some way. It may be just home-sickness, but I thought I would write to you, as there may be some little cause for her lack of Spirits that you could easily remove. Is she quite happy with her companions? Is the work proving too much for her?

I know you will forgive me troubling you on what may be a small matter, but I am sure you are as anxious as we are that Phyllis should not be unhappy at school.

Yours faithfully,

LENORE ALLEN.

5. To Principal, respecting an unsatisfactory Report

48 TOWERS ROAD,

EALING, W.5.

DEAR Miss WESTON,

I was most disappointed at receiving your report of Phyllis. I cannot understand it. She always seemed so interested in her lessons, and we had hopes of her doing brilliantly. I will talk to her very seriously, but I should be very grateful if you could throw any light upon the cause of her unsatisfactory work and behaviour. I cannot help feeling that there is some influence at work on her that is leading her astray.

Yours faithfully,

LENORE ALLEN.

6. To Principal, giving Notice of taking Pupil away

48 TOWERS ROAD,

EALING, W.5.

DEAR Miss WESTON,

I am sorry to tell you that my husband and I have decided to take Phyllis away from school, and I therefore have to give notice that she will be leaving you at the end of next term. I don’t think you will be very much surprised, and I hope you won’t regard our action in any way as a reflection upon you and your school, but Phyllis’s conduct and progress seem so unsatisfactory that we feel we should like to have her under our own observation for a time, and are going to employ a private governess for the present. I would like to thank you for the kindness and attention you have always shown.

Yours faithfully,

LENORE ALLEN.

7. To a Lady, inquiring about a School

48 TOWERS ROAD,

EALING, W.5.

DEAR MADAM,

I am thinking of sending my daughter to School, and its Principal, Miss Weston, tells me that your daughters were in her charge and that you would answer any inquiries about the school.

I should be very much obliged if you would tell me if you were always satisfied with the care given to your daughters, if the food and living conditions were quite satisfactory, and if your daughters made good progress in their studies. I am especially anxious that my daughter should have good tuition in French, music, and dancing. Are these subjects well taught

I enclose a stamped envelope and shall be very grateful for any information you can give me.

Yours faithfully,

LENORE ALLEN.

8. Reply

84 MARDEN AVENUE,

SALISBURY.

DEAR MADAM,

All my three daughters went to Miss Weston’s school, and I can say at once that I was always highly satisfied with the care taken of them and their progress. They were always very happy there, and their education was good, although they never attained very high academical honours. They all speak and read French well, but I do not know much about the music and dancing taught there, as all my daughters are unmusical and did not give much time to those subjects.

Yours faithfully,

ISABEL AINSLIE.

9. To Headmaster, complaining of Son being Bullied

84 PELBURY ROAD,

WANDSWORTM, S. W.18.

The Headmaster,

——— School.

DEAR SIR,

My son, Willie Pearce, has come home from school several days lately very much distressed. His ace was bruised, and he had evidently been knocked down. He win not tell me what happened on these occasions, but he is in such a nervous and frightened condition that I think he is being badly bullied and ill-treated by some of the bigger boys. I suspect the ringleader of them to be Alfred Clark. My boy has been very delicate, and is naturally nervous and timid, and I am very much afraid, if this treatment goes on, his health will suffer.

Please don’t think I write in a complaining spirit, or that I want the boys punished, but, if you would make inquiries and do anything in your power to stop my lad being ill-treated, I should be very grateful to you.

Yours faithfully,

ALICE PEARCE.

10. To Headmaster, asking that Son may be excused Sports

84 PELBURY ROAD,

WANDSWORTM, S. W.18.

The Headmaster,

——— School.

DEAR SIR,

The doctor says my son, James Allen, is suffering from a strained heart, and he advises me that he ought not to take any strenuous exercise. I shall be obliged therefore if you will have him excused football and physical trainmg for the next few months.

Yours faithfully,

T. H. ALLEN.

11. To Headmaster, asking that Son might take special Subjects

14 HALMA STREET,

RICHMOND.

The Headmaster,

——— School.

DEAR SIR,

Would it be possible for my son, Thomas Fenn, now in the 5th Form, to have special tuition in French and German? I am hoping he will get through the London Matriculation examination next month, and after that I should like him to give practically all his time to modern languages, as I hope to make him a journalist and they would be of great value to him. I should be glad to hear from you if this could be arranged. He will also need shorthand, but I presume that does not come in the school curriculum.

Yours faithfully,

F. B. FENN.

12. To Headmaster, asking Advice about Son’s Career

84 THE MALL,

HIGHEURY, N.5.

The Headmaster,

——— School.

DEAR SIR,

My son, George Bailey, will be leaving school at the end of this year, and I should be very grateful if you could give me any advice as to a suitable business for him. He is strongly opposed to doing any kind of office work, and I cannot afford to train him for any of the professions. I am afraid I am troubling you a great deal, but I am anxious to do the best I can for the boy, and thought perhaps you might be able to suggest an occupation for which he has shown special aptitude, or might know of openings through which he would obtain work on leaving school. I shall be very much obliged if you can help me.

I could afford to pay a small premium for indentures, and it is not necessary that the lad should begin to earn immediately, but I cannot afford to spend any more money on his training.

Yours faithfully,

A. L. BAILEY.

13. Engaging a Music Master

ACACIA COTTAGE,

TEWEESBURY.

DEAR SIR,

Thank you for your letter of Sept. 26th. 1 am willing to pay two guineas a quarter for weekly music lessons for my daughter, and the time yoif suggest—from 4 to 5 on Mondays—will be quite suitable. I shall be glad if you will start on Monday next, and I hope you will find my daughter a good pupil.

Yours sincerely,

ISABEL BROWN.

14. To a Music Master, complaining of slow Progress

ACACIA COTTAGE,

TEWEESBURY.

DEAR MR. WATSON,

My daughter has been taking lessons from you now for two years, and I am bound to say that I am very much dissatisfied with her progress. Her playing seems to me very poor indeed. Is it that she has no talent for music? Or doesn’t she try to do her best ? I am afraid that, if she does not get on better than this, I shall not think it worth while to continue the lessons.

Yours faithfully,

ISABEL BROWN.

15. Engaging a Tutor for special Coaching

CEDAR HOUSE,

DORKING.

DEAR SIR,

I want my son, who is now sixteen and has just heft ——— School, coached for the London University Matriculation examination. He took it in June last, but failed to get through in Mathematics, which has always been his weak subject. He will need to do revision in all subjects, of course, with special attention given to Mathematics. Will you please let Me know if you can undertake his coaching, what your terms would be, and what hours you would be able to give him?

Yours faithfully,

JOHN H. MAY.

16. Thanking Tutor

CEDAR HOUSE,

DORKING.

DEAR MR. JAMES,

I am very pleased to be able to tell you that my boy has passed the Matriculation examination, being placed in the second class. I am delighted with his success, and wish to thank you very sincerely for the care and attention you gave to coaching him, and to congratulate you on his success. The boy seemed to like working for you, and I think you got the very best out of him.

With very many thanks,

Yours sincerely,

JOHN H. MAY.

Circular Letters Samples and Examples

1. Enclosing new Price List

SIR or MADAM,

We beg to call your attention to the enclosed revised Price List. We are happy to announce that, owing to careful buying on a large scale, we have been able to offer a further reduction in many lines, and we are convinced that no more favourable terms are obtainable. We especially direct your attention to Section V (china and glassware), in which we are able to offer many striking novelties at remarkably low prices.

We hope you will shortly pay us a visit, or, if this is not possible, will avail yourself of our “Shopping by Post” system, full details of which will be found in the enclosed Price List.

Your orders shall always receive our best attention.

Yours faithfully,
MORGAN & WHITE.

2. On Opening new Premises

Mr. H. L. Purvis begs to announce that he is shortly opening new and commodious premises at 44—46 High Street, as a Poulterer’s and Fishmonger’s. The best quality goods will be supplied at moderate

prices, and no effort will be spared to give customers the utmost satisfaction. The building has been fitted up on the most modem hygienic principles, thus securing perfect cleanliness and freshness.

The premises will be open on June 16th, when Mr. Purvis respectfully begs the honour of your patronage.

3. On Extension of Premises

SIR or MADAM,

I beg to call your attention to the opening of the extension of these Premises at 48 High Street, , where I am starting a Fruit and flower Department.

In thanking you for past favours, I venture to hope for the continuance of your patronage and its extension to the new department. Best quality goods will be supplied at moderate prices, and every effort will be made to give my customers complete satisfaction.

Assuring you that your orders shall always have my best attention,

I beg to remain,
Yours respectfully,
H. L. PURVIS.

4. Announcing Sale

DEAR MADAM,

We beg to advise you that our Spring Sale will open on March I5th, and enclose catalogue showing a few of the great bargains that will be offered.

Prices have been reduced in some cases by over 50%, and in all departments exceptional opportunities are offered of obtaining high-class goods at prices far below cost. These are all goods bought for our general stock, and therefore are in every way up to the high standard of quality on which our reputation is based.

We hope you will be able to pay us a visit and make your own selections. If you are unable to do so, however, we shall be happy to reserve for you any goods ordered from the enclosed catalogue, to be dispatched on March 15th. Orders by post cannot be received after that date.

As all prices have been so greatly reduced, we can only sell these goods on a cash basis, and remittance in full must accompany orders. We pay carriage on all orders over L in value.

Assuring you always of our best attention, and awaiting your commands,

We are, Madam,
Yours obediently,
WATSON & PEEL.

5. Offering Special Goods

DEAR SIRS,

We have received advices of a consignment of dolls from our agents in Stuttgart. These are very fine models, superior to anything on the market at present, and, as we have secured the entire consignment at exceptional prices, we are able to offer them to our customers at a very attractive figure.

We enclose list, giving sizes and prices. If you would like to avail yourself of this offer, please let us hear from you by return, as our supply is limited and the models cannot be repeated this year.

The consignment is now at the docks, so that immediate delivery can be made.

Yours faithfully,
HALLAM & Co., Lit.

6. Notifying Change in Partnership

Messrs. Noakes, White, and Allen beg to announce that Mr. J. Noakes has now retired from partnership, and the firm will in future be known as White and Allen.

7. Ditto

DEAR SIR,

We beg to notify you that Mr. James Noakes has now become a partner in this firm, which will in future be known as White, Allen, and Noakes.

Yours faithfully,
L. T. WHITE.
B. ALLEN.

8. On Taking over Business

SIR or MADAM,

I beg to notify you that, on the retirement of Mr. J. Brown, I have taken over the business conducted by him under the style of 3. & T. Brown.

I propose to trade under the same title and hope to maintain the firm’s high tradition for quality, moderate prices, and prompt and courteous attention.

As I have worked with Mr. Brown for many years, I fully understand your requirements, and beg to assure you that your commands shall always have my best attention.

Yours respectfully,
W. W. THYME.
(Manager for Messrs. J. & T. Brown for iS years).

9. Notifying Change of Agent

DEAR SIRS,

We beg to notify you that we have appointed Mr. K. L. Read, of • our sole representative in London,

in place of Mr. L. P. Stone. Mr. Read hopes to have the pleasure of calling upon you shortly, and we trust you will favour him with a continuance of your inquiries and orders.

Yours faithfully,
ARNOLD & COOK.

10. Announcing Change of Manager

DEAR SIRS,

We beg to advise you that Mr. H. L. White ceased to be our General Manager on the 15th of this month and has no authority to act for us in any respect.

Mr. K. L. Allen has been appointed to succeed him.

Yours faithfully,
pp. BROWN & SONS, Ltd.
II. L. MOORE.

11. Notice of Suspension of Payment

SIR,

Owing to heavy losses, we find ourselves unable to carry on our business without grave risk, and have decided to suspend payment, believing this to be the best course to take in the interests of our creditors.

We have placed our books in the hands of Messrs. — & —, who will prepare a statement of our affairs and convene a meeting of creditors, at which we hope to make proposals that will be found acceptable.

Yours faithfully,
MooRE & RAPHAEL.

Sample Letters to Bankers and Solicitors

1. Instructing Bank to honour Signature

The Manager,

— Bank.

DEAR SIR,

Please note that from this date all cheques drawn on our AJcs will be signed by two Directors as heretofore and countersigned by Mr. A. L. Johnson instead of Mr. 8. Wright. Also all cheques payable to us will be endorsed by Mr. Johnson instead of by Mr. Wright.

Yours faithfully,

pp. TuE STUPENDOUSCo., Lrn.,

H. Moss (Chairman).

Mr. A. L. Johnson will sign here . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2. Opening a second Account

The Manager,

— Bank.

DEAR SIR,

I enclose cheque for £250 and shall be obliged if you will open a new A/c with this, to be known as the “T. H. Green, No. 2 Account.” Please send me pass book and book of 50 cheques to order, crossed.

Yours faithfully,

T. H. GREEN.

3. Stopping Payment of Cheque

The Manager,

— Bank.

DEAR SIR,

Will you please stop payment of cheque No. A 04816, drawn by me for £560 in favour of Messrs. P Loomis & Co?

Yours faithfully,

T. H. GREEN.

4. Paying in Cheque for Third Party

The Manager,

— Bank.

DEAR SIR,

I enclose cheque for £45, which please credit to the account of your client, Mr. H. L. Powell, of ——

Yours faithfully,

T. H. GREEN.

5. Asking for Overdraft

The Manager,

— Bank.

DEAR SIR,

I have several very large orders in hand, all from thins of good repute, and one for over £3,000 from the War Office. To meet immediate requirements I have to ask you to let me have an overdraft on my A/c up to £2,000 for six months on the usual terms. I should be obliged if you would let me Irnow at your earliest convenience if you have any objection to this, or wish for any further particulars.

Yours faithfully,

T. M. S. MORTON.

6. Letter of Credit

The — Bank,

Hong Kong.

DEAR SIRS,

This letter will be presented to you by our Mr. S. S. Jenkins, and we shall be obliged if you will honour his drafts up to £1,000 and debit our account.

Yours faithfully,

pp. T. MooRE & SoNs,

P. L. MooltE.

7. Advising Letter of Credit

The — Bank,

Hong Kong.

DEAR SIRS,

We have to-day given our Mr. S. S. Jenkins a Letter of Credit authorising him to draw upon you up to £1,000. Please honour his drafts up to this amount and debit our A/c. We enclose a copy of the Letter of Credit given to Mr. Jenkins, and his signature is appended. We also enclose photograph of Mr. Jenkins for purposes of identification if required.

Yours faithfully,

pp. T. Moons & SoNs,

P. L. Moons.

Mr. S. S. Jenkins will sign here . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8. Instructing a Solicitor to prepare a Power of Attorney

DEAR SIR,

As I am going abroad next month and expect to be away for a year, I wish to give a general Power of Attorney to Mr. James Watts, of 18 Mildmay Road, Kensington, to deal with my affairs. Will you please draw up the necessary document and let me know when it is ready for signature?

Yours faithfully,

M. P. HOLLAND.

9. To a Solicitor, giving Notice to pay off Mortgage

DEAR SIR,

I shall be obliged if you will inform your clients that I wish to pay off the mortgage on these premises, and herewith give the required six months’ notice.

Yours faithfully,

L. C. WEST.

10. To a Solicitor, accepting Service of Writ

DEAR SIR,

I have received your letter of the 14th, informing me that you have been instructed by Messrs. Mason & Co., Ltd., to bring an action in the High Court to recover £450 which they claim to be due to them.

My solicitors are Messrs. — & —, of — who will accept service on my behalf.

Yours faithfully,

T. L. WUITTTAKER.

Sample Trade and Dealing Business Letters

1. To Wholesalers, opening an Account

DEAR SIRS,

I am shortly opening these premises as a High Class Provision Stores. I was for many years with Messrs.   & Co., where I handled your goods, and should like to open an Account with you.

Will you please send me your complete priced catalogue, and let me know what are the best terms you can offer me as to discounts and credit?

I am already known to your Mr. Anderson, and, if you wish to make any further inquiries, Mr.  of Messrs. —  & Co., and Mr. J. T. Brown, of this town, who already deals with you, know me very well.

Yours faithfully,

3. T. MORGAN.

2. To Wholesalers, enclosing Order

DEAR SIRS,

I am very much obliged by your letter of the 6th inst., with enclosures, and thank you very much for your offer of three months’ credit.

I enclose order, and shall be glad to have delivery at your earliest convenience.

I expect to do a high-class trade here, and shall always be glad to see your representative and to hear from you in reference to any new lines or special offers you have to make.

Yours faithfully,

3. T. MORGAN.

3. To Wholesalers, asking for special Quotation

DEAR SIRS,

I shall be obliged if you will let me know what is the lowest price you can quote me for a good quality China tea for a regular order of  per month.

Yours faithfully,

J. T. MORGAN.

4. To Wholesalers, complaining of Delay in Delivery

DEAR SIRS,

I must protest most strongly against the delay in delivering my order (No. Y842) placed with you on Oct. 20th. I have ‘phoned and wired you, but, although I have had plenty of promises, I am still without the goods. It is causing me the very greatest inconvenience, and I am losing trade through it every day. I must really ask you to let me have these goods immediately, or return my order. I cannot understand why you treat an old customer in this way.

Yours faithfully,

3. T. MORGAN.

5. To Wholesalers, notifying damaged Goods

DEAR SIRS,

The six bales of linen were delivered by the L.N.E.R. yesterday to our order (No. P84), but, on opening them, we find that four o the bales have been damaged, apparently before leaving the warehouse, and are quite unsaleable. We are returning them to you (per L.N.E.R.) and shall be obliged if you will replace them or let us have credit note for the value.

Yours faithfully,

pp. C. ALSON & SONS,

T. M. SMITH.

6. To Wholesalers, complaining of Quality of Goods received

DEAR SIRS,

We have received the rugs (Order No. L4 but they are not in any way up to the sample on which we ordered, and we must decline to accept them at the price invoiced. We could not dispose of them in this neighbourhood except at a loss. We are holding them till we hear from you. If you care to make a substantial reduction in the price, we will go into the matter again. but, failing this, we must return the rugs.

Yours faithfully,

pp. H. L. SMITH & Co.

H.L.S.

7. To a Railway Co., claiming for damaged Goods

The Superintendent,

Goods Station, L. N.E. R.

York.

DEAR SIR,

I received from you yesterday six crates of china, for which I signed as received damaged. I have now examined them carefully, and enclose herewith detailed claim. The goods are here awaiting your inspection, and I shall be glad if your representative will call at once, as they must be cleared.

Yours faithfully,

PERCYLAKE.

8. To Customer, acknowledging Receipt of Order

DEAR SIR,

Your esteemed order of April 13th has been duly received, and I beg to assure you it shall have my best attention. I hope to despatch the goods on Friday next, and am sure they will give you every satisfaction.

Thanking you very much, and trusting to be favoured with your further commands,

I am, Sir,

Yours obediently,

H. L. PYLE.

9. To Customer, acknowledging Receipt of Order and offering alternative Goods

DEAR SIR,

I thank you very much for your esteemed order of the 18th, but I regret I am not able to supply the dozen half-hose to your pattern. These are last year’s stock, and are no longer obtainable. I enclose however a similar article, which I can supply at 52/6 a dozen—slightly higher than the price you quote. I shall be obliged by your instructions about these, and meanwhile am despatching the rest of your order to-day by Parcels Post, and trust the goods will reach you in good order, and give you every satisfaction.

Again thanking you, and assuring you always of my best attention,

I remain,

Yours obediently,

M. S. MILES.

10. To Customer, refusing Credit

DEAR MADAM,

I thank you very much for your order of the 14th. I enclose invoice and shall be happy to dispatch the goods immediately on receiving remittance from you. I regret very much that I can only do business on a cash basis, but my prices give so small a margin of profit that it does not allow me to give credit.

Assuring you always of my best attention,

I am, Madam,

Yours obediently,

T. S. JACKSON.

11. To Customer, asking for Payment

DEAR S

I beg respectfully to call your attention to the enclosed Account. As I have some very heavy payments to meet this month, I should esteem it a great favour if you would let me have a cheque.

Yours respectfully,

H. MAYERS.

(See also letters on this subject — “Letters In Reference to Accounts.”)

12. To Customer, answering Complaint about Goods

DEAR MADAM,

We regret very much that you should have cause to complain of the goods supplied by us. We are at a loss to understand this, and shall be very much obliged if you will return them to us, carriage forward. When we have examined them, we will write you again.

Yours faithfully,

pp.A.L.TOWERS, Lim.,

T. H. WAns.

13. To Customer, answering Complaint of Delay

DEAR MADAM,

I am sorry I have not been able to dispatch the wall-paper ordered by you on Aug. 2nd. I happen to be out of stock of this particular line, and, although I have been expecting a delivery from the manufacturers daily, it has not yet come to hand. I hope to be able to despatch any day now.

I have in stock a very similar paper, of which I enclose sample. If you care to take this instead, I can despatch from stock immediately on heating from you.

I regret very much that you should have been inconvenienced by the delay.

Yours faithfully,

THOMAS MITCHELL.

14. To Customer, answering Complaint of Charges

DEAR SIR,

I have received your letter of the 29th ult., and regret very much that you should see ft to describe my charges as outrageous. I think this is an abuse of language. I have gone into the Account again and compared the charges with my costs, and I am not able to agree that any item is over-charged. For good work these are fair and reason able prices.

In regard to the three items you query in particular, these are all for jobs in which skilled labour was employed, and possibly you are not aware that good upholsterers get as much as 3/- and 4/- an hour. French polishing is also entirely a matter of skilled labour.

In the circumstances I am not able to make any reduction, and shall be glad to have your cheque in settlement at your early convenience.

Yours faithfully,

S. P. WATSON.

Sample Letters Dealing with Orders, Quotations, References and Transport

1. Opening a new Account

DEAR SIR,

We thank you for your letter of the 1st inst., and have pleasure in enclosing our catalogues. We shall be happy to execute your orders on our usual terms—2.5% at one month) or 3 for prompt cash, and trust this may be the beginning of a long and mutually profitable connection between us.

Our Mr. Allen hopes to call upon you on the 12th inst., and your orders, passed to him or sent to us direct, will always have our immediate attention. Mr. Allen will also be pleased to discuss with you various suggestions in which we could help you in the way of window display, circularising, &c. We like to help our customers in every way possible and hope you will not hesitate to write to us whenever we can be of use.

Yours faithfully,

pp. Tun UNIVERSAL PRODUCE Co., LTD.,

H. MARSUALL.

2. Asking for References before opening a new Account

DEAR SIR,

We are obliged by your letter of the 4th and note you wish to open a credit Account with us. We shall be very happy to offer the usual facilities; but, as this is our first transaction with you, may we trouble you to send us the customary references, so as to put the matter in order? On hearing from you, we. will dispatch our full catalogue, and hope to be favoured with your orders.

Yours faithfully,

pp. Taa LONDON PRODUCE Co., LTD.,

H. MARSHALL

3. Making Inquiries about Customer who wishes to open Account

DEAR SIRS,

Mr. —, of —, has applied to credit account and given us your name. We shall take it as a very great favour if you would tell us, in strict confidence, anything you know of him and standing. We enclose stamped envelope.

Yours faithfully,

pp. TEE LoNDoN PRODUCE Co., LTD.,

H. MARSHALL.

4. Reply

DEAR SIRS,

In reply to your letter of the 8th, I may say that I have known Mr. — for many years and have a high opinion of his character, business ability, and integrity. I do not know what capital he has, but he is starting business under very favourable conditions, and I should certainly regard him as safe for reasonable credit.

Yours faithfully,

P. T. MALcOLM.

5. Granting special Terms to Retailer

DEAR SIR,

We have received your letter of the 10th inst., and regret to hear that you have not been able to dispose of our goods so quickly as you anticipated. Apparently you have made the mistake of overstocking, and, as we have no doubt the goods will sell if properly displayed, we have decided for this time to grant you special credit. We will allow the March Account to stand over to the end of June and allow the usual discount.

It must be clearly understood however that this is a special concession to you in the belief that you have made a mistake, and it cannot be repeated. In future we hope you will be able to order more closely to your requirements, as we do not like our customers to feel dissatisfied with our goods.

Yours faithfully,

pp. THE LONDON PRODUCE Co., LTD.,

H. MARSHALL.

6. From Wholesalers, answering Complaint of Delay

DEAR SIR,

We regret very much we have not been able to execute your order (No. L 481) as soon as we anticipated. We have had great difficulties in getting our usual supplies from the French shippers, but have now been advised that a large shipment should reach us in two days’ time. We have every confidence therefore of being able to dispatch the goods to you before the end of this week.

With sincere regret for the inconvenience caused you,

We are, Yours faithfully,

pp. P. H. Wu & Co.

T. M. Wmm.

7. From Wholesalers, answering Complaint of Quality

DEAR SIR,

We have received your letter of the 12th, and are at a loss to understand your complaint as to the quality of the linen supplied to you. This is a line we have sold constantly for years and have received no complaints from other customers. It is made in our own mills, and the source of the raw material has not been changed. We think therefore you must be under a misapprehension in thinking the quality is inferior to previous supplies. We are, however, sending our Mr. H. L. White to inspect the goods and will write you further when we have received his report.

Yours faithfully,

pp. L. PIGGOTT & SONS,

B.M.P.

8. From Wholesalers, answering Complaint, and refusing to accept Returned Goods

DEAR SIR,

We have received your letter of the znd and have investigated the complaints you make. We do not think they are justified. The variations in quality are no more than is usual, and indeed unavoidable, in this class of goods, and the terms of your order have been fully complied with.

We regret the slight delay in delivery, but cannot admit that this justifies your throwing the goods upon our hands.

We must therefore refuse to accept the goods if returned, and shall insist upon settlement in full in due course.

Yours faithfully,

pp. K. L. MOORE & SON,

P.T.L.

9. To Retailer, complaining of underselling Prices

DEAR SIR,

It has been brought to our notice that you are- selling our patent — at 9/3 each. We would call your attention to the fact that these are supplied on the express condition that they shall not be retailed at less than xo/6 and shall be glad to hear from you that you are willing to conform to our conditions, or we shall be regretfully compelled to refuse to supply you.

We would like to add that our condition is made solely in the interests of retailers.

Yours faithfully,

pp. TEE UToPIA Co., LTD.,

H. WRITE (Manager).

10. Acknowledging Request for Quotation

DEAR SIR,

We are very much obliged for your letter of the 28th, asking us to quote for —. As we wish to give you the very best price possible, we are going carefully into this and making special inquiries, and will write you fully in the course of a few days.

Yours faithfully,

pp. THE CROWN CONSTRUCTION Co., LTD.,

T. M. RwLEY

11. Asking for Quotation

DEAR SIRs,

We shall be glad to have your lowest price for supplying 5,000 booklets similar to the enclosed, twelve ball-tone blocks, 4in. by 3in., to be made from sketches supplied by us. We shall want delivery certain by July 10th.

Yours faithfully,

pp. H. ARNOLD & SONS,

P.L.S.

12. To a Railway Company, it missing Goods

The Goods Manager,

— Railway.

DEAR SIR,

Twenty crates have been invoiced from Messrs. & Co., of —, and sixteen only have been delivered.

I have taken the matter up with Messrs. — & Co., who inform me they delivered the twenty crates to the — Railway at —, and hold a receipt from the Company, signed H. A. Blake. I shall be glad therefore if you will make inquiries for the missing four crates.

Yours faithfully,

H. W. POWELL.

13. To a Railway Co., asking for special Rates

The Superintendent,

Goods Station, — Railway.

PEAR SIR,

We are tendering for a very large order, which will entail the carriage of from twenty to thirty tons of periodicals from these works to London each week. Dis patches would be made each night, and the goods must be collected from these works each evening about 4 o’clock  As we have to include cost of carriage in our tender, will you please let us know what is the lowest possible rate you can quote for this?

Yours faithfully,

pp. T ACME PRINTING Co.,

S. P. ALLEN.

14. Advising Shipping Agents of Dispatch of Goods

DEAR SIRS,

We have this day dispatched to you, per L.N.E.R, 20 crates for shipment, per S.S. Orlando, to Cape Town, consigned to A. L. White & Co. of that port. Please send bills of lading and statement of shipping charges to us direct. We are effecting insurance ourselves.

We append particulars of shipment.

Yours faithfully,

pp. MERVYN BROTHERS,

A. PALMER.

Particulars—

1— 5.         5 crates 200 pieces china . . value £100

6—14.       9 crates 320 pieces glassware . . value £220

15—20.    6 crates 100 pieces of alabaster figures . . value £100

15. Insuring Goods Shipped

DEAR SIRS,

Please let us have an insurance policy against all risks for £420 on 20 crates shipped per s.s. Orlando from Southampton to Cape Town, consigned to Messrs. A. L. White & Co. We append particulars.

Yours faithfully,

pp. MERVYN BROTHERS.

A. PALMER.

Particulars as above.

Business Letters in Reference to Accounts

1. Sending Cheque in Settlement of A/c

DEAR SIRS,

We have pleasure in enclosing herewith cheque for —, in full settlement of your A/c, and shall be glad to have your receipt.

Yours faithfully,

pp. WILSON & SONS,

H.L.

2. Sending Cheque in part Settlement of A/c

DEAR SIRS,

We have pleasure in sending herewith cheque for zoo in part settlement of your A/c. We hope to let you have a cheque for the balance outstanding next month, and trust this will be satisfactory to you. Please let us have your acknowledgement.

Yours faithfully,

pp. WILSON & SONS,

H.L.

3. Sending Bill in Settlement of A/c

DEAR SIRS,

We regret that we are not able to send you cheque in settlement of your A/c this month. We have had great difficulty in collecting A/cs due to us and are, in consequence, rather pressed for ready money. We send you however a Bill payable at three months, and beg that you will favour us by accepting this.

Yours faithfully,

pp. WILSON & SONS,

H.L.

4. Requesting Acceptance of Bill

DEAR SIRS,

We shall be very much obliged if you will accept the enclosed Bill for —, payable at three months, and return to us. We are sorry to trouble you, but find ourselves pressed for ready money just now.

Thanking you for your prompt attention,

We are, Yours faithfully,

pp. WILSON & SONS,

H.L.

5. Requesting Payment on A/c of Work done

DEAR SIR,

We should be very much obliged if you could let us have a cheque on a/c of the work we have in hand for you. Work to the value of over $… has been completed, and it would be a great convenience to us if you could let us have a cheque for, say, $… to meet payments that have now to be made for material.

Yours faithfully,

pp. T, P. WATSON & Co.,

H. Price

6. Requesting Payment before Delivery of Goods

DEAR SIR,

The posters ordered by you are now ready. We enclose invoice, and will dispatch immediately on receiving remittance from you.

Yours faithfully,

pp. BRIGHT & Co., LTD.,

D.S.L.

7. Requesting Payment of A/c

DEAR SIR,

I beg to call your attention to my A/c rendered in July last for £84 8s. ôd., which is now considerably over-due. No doubt the matter has escaped yonr atten tion, and I should be glad to have cheque at your early convenience.

Yours faithfully,

H. S. SMITH.

8. Repeating Request for Payment of A/c

DEAR SIR,

I wrote you on the 9th uIt., asking for payment of my A/c for £84 8s. 6d., rendered in July last, but so far have received no reply. I think six months is a very unreasonable credit to expect for work of this kind, and I cannot allow the A/c to stand over any longer. Please let me have your cheque by return.

Yours faithfully,

H. S. SMITH.

9. Requesting Payment of A/c and threatening legal Proceedings

DEAR SIR,

I have already written you twice about my A/c for £84 Ss. 6d. rendered in July last and have received no reply. I am unable to wait any longer, and, if I do not receive cheque in full settlement by the end of this week, I shall be compelled to place the A/c in the hands of my solicitors for collection. I am very loth to do this, but, as you do not answer my letters, no other course is open to me. I cannot understand why you are treating me in this discourteous manner.

Yours faithfully,

H. S. SMITH.

10. Asking for Time in Settling A/c

DEAR SIR,

I regret that your A/c should have been so long outstanding. I have had very heavy expenses to meet lately and at the same time have been unable to collect several large A/cs due to me. In the circumstances I should take it as a great favour if you would allow the A/c to stand over for a few weeks longer.

Yours faithfully,

BENJAMIN LOCKE.

11. Promising Payment and deprecating legal Proceedings

DEAR SIR,

I regret very much that your A/c has not been paid before this, but I hope you will not think it necessary to go to the trouble and expense of legal proceedings. Owing to circumstances into which I need not enter here, I have been pressed for ready money lately, but the embarrassment is only temporary, and I can promise definitely that your A/c shall be settled at the end of this month.

Yours faithfully,

BENJAMIN LocicE.

12. Complaining of a Returned Bill of Exchange

SIR,

I am much surprised and vexed at having returned to me the Bill I drew upon you in accordance with the terms agreed upon between us. When you found that you were not in a position to meet the bill) you should have advised me of the fact, so as to enable me to make some arrangement. Your not having done this has put me to the greatest inconvenience, and I must inform you that unless you make arrangements to meet the Bill within ten days I shall be compelled to take the usual steps.

Yours faithfully,

N. UNDERWOOD.

13. Disputing an A/c

DEAR SIR,

We have received your statement for September, but are returning it herewith, as it does not agree with our books.

You have charged us zx/- a doz. for silk stockings on three dates. Your quotation (Ref.—LM/8421) was 20/3 a dozen.

On the 10th you have charged io dozen suede gloves. We only ordered and received 6 doz.

The item for woollen vests (gents.) appears to be charged to us in error. We have no trace of them.

We shall be obliged if you will look into these matters and let us have a corrected statement in due course.

Yours faithfully,

pp. L. JONES & SON,

B.H.W.

14. Acknowledging Receipt of Cheque

DEAR SIR,

We have pleasure in acknowledging the receipt of cheque for £ in settlement of your A/c to May 3 last, and enclose receipt.

Assuring you always of our best attention,

We remain, Yours faithfully,

pp. SLOWAN & Co., L

H.P.S.

15. Disallowing Discount

DEAR SIR,

We have pleasure in acknowledging the receipt of your cheque for £— in settlement of your A/c to June 30th last, but note that you have deducted 4% as discount. We regret we cannot allow this. Our terms are 3 for prompt cash and 4% on monthly A/cs, and these terms were stated when acknowledging your order, and are printed on our invoices. This A/c is ten weeks old, and therefore is not subject to discount. We shall be obliged if you will let us have a cheque for the balance (£). when we will send you receipt for the full amount.

Yours faithfully,

pp. C. MORGAN & Co.,

C.T.B.

16. Requesting Payment to reduce Debit

DEAR Sis,

We thank you for your order for woollen goods (No. L821) but must point out to you that the debit balance on your A/c is now $219, and exceeds the amount ($200) to which we agreed to go in giving you credit. We shall therefore be obliged if you will send us cheque to reduce your debt to us, when we shall be happy to give your order our immediate attention.

Yours faithfully,

pp. C. MORGAN & Co.,

C.T.B.

17. Requesting Payment to avoid Bankruptcy

DEAR SIRS,

I am being very much pressed just now by a large creditor who has suddenly called in a debt I had not expected to be called upon to pay for some months. This is causing me much embarrassment, and I shall be in grave difficulties unless I can raise £500. I have orders in hand for you worth over £200, and, as I know you have always been satisfied with my work and would view my having to file my petition with very great regret, I venture to ask you if you could let me have a cheque for £ or £200 on a/c of that order.

I am very sorry to have to make this request, but I hope you will see your way to obliging me. I shall regard it as a very great favour.

Once this creditor is satisfied, I have no further fear of insolvency, as trade is good, and my other debts are small.

Yours faithfully,

C. S. HOWARD.

18. Requesting Payment not due

DEAR SIRS,

We find that your A/c with us, due for settlement at the end of April, is £249 10s As we are rather pressed for ready money just now, we are willing to allow you a special discount of 5% on this for settlement this week. We should be glad to hear by return if this proposal is acceptable to you.

Yours faithfully,

pp. C. MORGAN & SON,

C.T.B.